Free Ed Tech Resources eBook

  • Over 100 Pages of Free Instructional Technology Resources
  • Tools for collaboration, gamification, active learning, screencasting, tablets, smartphones, and much more!
  • YOURS FREE just for signing up for blog posts!
 

Sign Up Now

 

Chromebooks in Education

by Kelly Walsh on November 9, 2011

Share

A brief introduction to the Google Chromebook netbook computer.

Guest Post by Karishma Marathe

Google’s Chromebook was launched in 2010 – a netbook that uses Google’s cloud based Chrome OS operating system. It looks exactly like a netbook, but here’s the interesting part: the Chromebook does not have any physical storage, instead, all user data and applications are stored in Google’s cloud.  So you have all the benefits of a notebook (roomy keyboard, solid exterior, etc.) with the all the qualities of a tablet device (a clean web browser, tons of applications, and so on).

Google Chromebook for education web page link

“Cloud computing” is a commonly heard phrase in tech circles these days, but we’re not all too clear on what it means. Running an IT Support company in Bristol, it’s something that we get asked a lot about lately. Cloud Computing essentially means getting services over the Internet, such as software applications, file storage, and so on, typically accessed using a Web
browser.

In May, EmergingEdTech wrote about the reasons why education needs to welcome internet technologies, and  the Chromebook is a dexterous tool to support this new revolution in the way young people, and adults, learn and work.  Almost every school aged child has used the Internet – whether it’s for academic or personal use, and the Chromebook is a natural extension of this.  What might strike users though is that there is no ‘desktop’ concept here – you open the Web browser and download apps as you wish.

Chromebooks are entirely dependent on the Internet for performance, and have built-in Wi-Fi and optional 3G – so portability is no issue, and since everything is stored in the cloud, students and teachers can continue working from home too, without the fear of losing data.  Schools can also make use of Google’s suit of collaboration and management tools and obtain numerous web-based resources.

Chromebook makes computing a simpler experience and it helps that it’s very fast, to boot (pun intended!) – the average start up time is just 8 seconds! And it helps that it has a really long battery life too.  Another really cool thing about the Chromebook is that it has an automatic update feature. But it’s important to remember that the Chromebook can only function
if the user has Wi-Fi, if not, then the device is unfortunately, completely worthless.  However, the bright side is that 3G/4G technology is spreading quickly.

Some people are of the opinion that the Chrome OS can be difficult for the average user – compared to the iPad for example which is famous for its simplicity, but one should keep in mind the cost and the positive physical attributes of the Chromebook, like the fact that not everyone is comfortable typing without a physical keyboard.

To learn more about the advantages of the Chromebook for Education (and Business), visit this Chromebook web page from Google.

Related Posts (if the above topic is of interest, you might want to check these out):
10 Internet Technologies Educators Should Be Informed About – 2011 Update
Someday students will carry a tablet computer instead of books (it’s just a matter of time)
10 Excellent iPad Applications for Teachers

About 

Kelly Walsh is Chief Information Officer and a faculty member at The College of Westchester in White Plains, NY and is the founder and author of EmergingEdTech.com. As an education technology advocate, he frequently delivers presentations on a variety of related topics at schools and conferences across the U.S. Walsh is also an author, and online educator, periodically running Flipped Class Workshops online. His latest eBook, the Flipped Classroom Workshop-in-a-Book was published in September, 2013 and is available here. In his spare time Walsh also writes, records, and performs original (and cover) songs (look for "K. Walsh" on iTunes or Amazon.com or check out his original song videos on here on YouTube ).

Print This Post Print This Post

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Adam December 29, 2011 at 9:24 am

You raise interesting points about the benefits of the Chromebook for education. However some institutions will still require access to Windows applications. In order to extend the benefits of Chromebooks schools will need to provide quick and easy browser-based access to these Windows applications and also to virtual desktops. Ericom AccessNow provides this support and enables Chromebook users to connect to Terminal Servers, physical desktops or VDI virtual desktops – and run Windows applications and desktops within a browser window, without having to install anything on the user device.

Here’s an example of a large school district that is using Ericom AccessNow to provide 30,000 students and staff access to Windows applications from Chromebooks, iPads and other devices:
http://www.ericom.com/pr/pr_111206.asp?URL_ID=708

Ericom also offers special pricing for education customers.

For more info, and to download a demo, visit:
http://www.ericom.com/html5_RDP_Chromebook.asp?URL_ID=708

Note: I work for Ericom

dumpty December 9, 2011 at 10:31 am

I believe that iPads have essential role in our education. We use iPad when we take down notes during classes via Ghostwriter Notes ap which is available at http://majorspot.com

The app is very usable that we can use all its features in class. Students are actually getting better grades.

Leave a Comment

{ 7 trackbacks }

Previous post:

Next post: